Jenny La Fleur
tudor urges - Jenny La Fleur
adventures in costuming
jennylafleur
jennylafleur
tudor urges

Okay my Renaissance experts - would this be an appropriate fabric for a Henry VIII era Tudor gown?



After following isabelladangelo around the Ren Faire this weekend in her pretty Princess Elizabeth gown I suddenly have an urge to make one but this is the only fabric in my stash remotely appropriate. I'm seeing mostly solid fabrics as the dress (designs on the forepart/sleeves) but did they always use solids for the main dress? I just don't know the period well enough to know if this would be okay or not...

Help my LJ Oracle you are my only hope!

Tags:

23 comments | comment?
Comments
sewloud From: sewloud Date: October 25th, 2011 09:39 pm (UTC) (link)
I don't think it's as common but there certainly are examples

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Catherine_Parr.jpg

and sometimes the things we think of as being solid actually have a subtle design

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portraitLarge/mw04264/Queen-Mary-I?LinkID=mp02995&search=sas&sText=mary+I&role=sit&rNo=1
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:42 am (UTC) (link)
Yeah I seeing lots of texture but not much contrast - interesting!
unclrashid From: unclrashid Date: October 25th, 2011 10:06 pm (UTC) (link)
I think this brocade is in the ballpark for very high upper class Tudor. A quick internet survey leads me to believe that 5% to 10% of female Tudor portraits show brocade overgowns. Most tend to be a bit less high contrast than yours, but some are close. The pattern of your brocade reads as mostly Tudor with a very slight Baroque slant due to the ornately feathery acanthus foliage. The central motif of a lotus blossom may be slightly exotic in a Tudor context, but most people won't notice that.
curiouschilde From: curiouschilde Date: October 25th, 2011 10:27 pm (UTC) (link)
I have to agree with the two above me!! The brocades you would see were usually tone on tone. But your fabric is gorgeous and it's in your stash!! AWESOME!!! Deeeeewwwwww eeeeiiitttt!!!!
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:41 am (UTC) (link)
Hee hee! Thanks for your impute! I love thi fabric so I want to make sure I use it for the best project!
mlsdesigns From: mlsdesigns Date: October 25th, 2011 10:31 pm (UTC) (link)
I have no idea if it's right or not, but it's certainly gorgeous fabric, and the colours will suit you so perfectly it would be a crime not to :D
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:40 am (UTC) (link)
I know I love it so I want to make sure I use it for the best project! Sounds like that might be a Ventian rather than a Tudor...
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 26th, 2011 01:31 pm (UTC) (link)
Well now that you mention it that is what I originally snagged the fabric for. :> Unfortunately it's the Tudor and not the Venetian that is singing a siren song at the moment. It does seem a bit of a pity not to use it for Venetian though doesn't it? *ponders*
love3angle From: love3angle Date: October 25th, 2011 10:57 pm (UTC) (link)
To my eye, it's close. Not perfect, but close. Very few people are going to know enough to bug you about it and you can always hit them if they do. I think it will make a lovely gown. :-)
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: November 9th, 2011 01:37 pm (UTC) (link)
Thanks so much for your impute! That's right, anyone close enough to criticize is close enough to kick right? :>
aimeekitty From: aimeekitty Date: October 26th, 2011 12:04 am (UTC) (link)
so pretty! I have no idea about accuracy though
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:40 am (UTC) (link)
I know I love it so I want to make sure I use it for the best project!
isabelladangelo From: isabelladangelo Date: October 26th, 2011 01:27 am (UTC) (link)
The two different colors in a brocade/damask/ect was more common in Italy (where a lot of the silks and exotic fabrics would come in, hence first dips) and was also more common in the later half of the 16th Century. That being said, it's not unheard of either in England.

You might want to see if you have any velvet in your stash or solid taffeta to use instead. You can totally use the poinsetta fabric as well, but it looks a couple of decades later to my eye.
isabelladangelo From: isabelladangelo Date: October 26th, 2011 01:31 am (UTC) (link)
This is from the 1550's:
http://www.marileecody.com/mary1-new3.jpg

All of Mary's gowns from earlier, as well as Elizabeth's, have the tone on tone look.
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:39 am (UTC) (link)
Thanks so much for your advice, I do appreciate it! I wish I had some velvet on hand! What about faille? I found some chocolate brown in the stash...
isabelladangelo From: isabelladangelo Date: October 27th, 2011 02:41 am (UTC) (link)
Ribbed fabric isn't seen much in the 16th Century. There is one extant piece that looks sort of like cut velvet in rows making it look like a ribbed fabric but that's the closest I know. Want me to come over and go over you fabric stash to point out the proper fabric? :-) Velvet, velveteen, uncut corduroy (it's not perfect but it looks right until you have your nose against the fabric), silk taffeta, satin silk, and tone on tone brocades are your best bets.
myladyswardrobe From: myladyswardrobe Date: October 26th, 2011 04:10 pm (UTC) (link)
Really depends on how authentic you want to be.

Brocade/Damask like that isn't often used as the main gown but its not unheard of.
Single Block colour fabric really makes a brocade like that "pop" if its used for kirtle/forepart and undersleeves. Pick the main colour from it for silk or velvet top layer.

Sometimes you get a damask but its in one colour - so you have the texture/pattern part of it.

jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: October 27th, 2011 12:38 am (UTC) (link)
Thanks so much for your two pence! That confirms what I was thinking and what I'm hearing. I think I'd rather be more on the authentic side. I really hate to use that fabric for something that isn't quite right, I'd SO regret it when I got the urge to make a Venetian you know?

What about silk faille? I found some chocolate brown in the stash...
myladyswardrobe From: myladyswardrobe Date: October 27th, 2011 08:15 am (UTC) (link)
I'm going to say yes to the silk faille. The ribbing is so fine it really doesn't matter. I have a black doublet bodice which is very heavily ribbed satin (though not really super shiny satin).

Certainly we would pass a good quality silk faille at Kentwell, not that would matter to you. ;-)
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: November 9th, 2011 01:38 pm (UTC) (link)
Thanks so much! No, it's always good to know what Kentwell would think! :P
kimikosews From: kimikosews Date: November 7th, 2011 03:35 am (UTC) (link)
I like it! Not fully Tudor period, but it is a very lovely fabric. Bess has some great suggestions as well. I'd use the fabric for a kirtle, with a velvet gown over it. If you get too hot to wear the gown, then you'd still have a lovely kirtle to wear.
jennylafleur From: jennylafleur Date: November 9th, 2011 01:40 pm (UTC) (link)
Thanks so much for your impute, it is very helpful! I'm still pondering but I have to say I do like the idea of a velvet gown over it...
23 comments | comment?